Allah-Las

Allah-Las
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Veranstalter: Trinity Music

Die kalifornische Psych-Popband Allah-Las ist zurück Mit „Calico Review“ kündigen die Vier... mehr

Die kalifornische Psych-Popband Allah-Las ist zurück
Mit „Calico Review“ kündigen die Vier den Nachfolger zum 2014 erschienen Album „Worship the sun“ an
Im Herbst diesen Jahres gehen sie auf Deutschlandtour

“We were all music fans before we were musicians,” says Matthew Correia, drummer of Los Angeles quartet the Allah-Las. “We’ve spent a lot of time listening to music, and understanding what works for us and what doesn’t. Quentin Tarantino didn’t go to film school, and we didn’t go to music school.” You could go to music school to understand theory and philosophy and even technique, but you wouldn’t be able to capture the experience, especially if rock ‘n’ roll was your trade. For that, you would take a more ad hoc approach to education, and for three of the members of the Allah-Las, that involved working together at Amoeba Music in Hollywood, the centerpiece of modern music retail in Los Angeles.

Bonding over the slower, moodier tracks on the fringe of the music they loved, guitarist Pedrum Siadatian, bassist Spencer Dunham, and Correia grew their band from behind the counter to the basements nearby back in 2008. Eventually folding in guitarist Miles Michaud, the Allah-Las took their time to find a sound, write original material, and ultimately add their own contributions to the canon from which they drew their primary inspiration. Following two well-received albums (2012’s self-titled debut and 2014’s Worship the Sun), the Allah-Las have found a new home with Mexican Summer.

Their third fulllength Calico Review summarizes and grows upon the lessons learned by the group thus far, and marks their most subtle and diverse work to date. Look for the Allah-Las on tour near you. Biography If you drive past the 200 block of South La Brea, there is a lamp shop, a pet shop, and a little glass door that says “Casting Agency” above it. Inside you’ll find one of LA’s most stereotypical rituals, where men & women from all walks of life vie for the attention and popularity of the Hollywood producer. It’s a dream factory for some of them. It’s also a place where Los Angeles outsiders learn what the city is really like, beyond the sun and surf and celebrities, where every brightly-lit surface eventually faces a cloud.

Indeed, the lessons learned by the Allah-Las – guitarists Miles Michaud and Pedrum Siadatian, bassist Spencer Dunham, drummer Matthew Correia – since their auspicious formation in 2008 have been tempered with experience. Now, with their third album Calico Review (their first for Mexican Summer), their experience transforms once more, this time into wisdom. The band’s trajectory, formed around mutual appreciation for the same kinds of music and a host of shared experiences, focuses on both the outer trappings of their home and surroundings, and the through line of darkness that suffuses life in LA county. If you drive past the 200 block of South La Brea, there is a lamp shop, a pet shop, and a little glass door that says “Casting Agency” above it.

Inside you’ll find one of LA’s most stereotypical rituals, where men & women from all walks of life vie for the attention and popularity of the Hollywood producer. It’s a dream factory for some of them. It’s also a place where Los Angeles outsiders learn what the city is really like, beyond the sun and surf and celebrities, where every brightly-lit surface eventually faces a cloud. Indeed, the lessons learned by the Allah-Las – guitarists Miles Michaud and Pedrum Siadatian, bassist Spencer Dunham, drummer Matthew Correia – since their auspicious formation in 2008 have been tempered with experience. Now, with their third album Calico Review (their first for Mexican Summer), their experience transforms once more, this time into wisdom.

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